Archiv der Kategorie: Summaries

The – yet – only englishspoken section of Bürgerrechte & Polizei/CILIP. FInd here a brief summary of all articles of each edition.

Summaries

The cold war has come to an end, intelligence agencies in the East and the West have lost their respective central adversaries. In the GDR, the domestic intelligence agency within the Ministry of State Security was dissolved prior to East Germany’s incorporation into West Germany. No more work for the do-mestic intelligence agency bureaus in the FRG? This issue of CILIP is devoted to the past and present realities of the domestic intelligence agencies in the GDR and the FRG. Summaries weiterlesen

Summaries

And who watches the warden? The old conundrum remains as cogent as ever in this issue of CILIP primarily devoted to police controls. Three articles deal directly with police complaint boards in other Western countries. And we do-cument an interview with one of the numerous Citizens‘ Committees formed last December in the GDR for the purpose of dismantling that country’s State Security (Stasi = [Ministerium für] Staatssicherheit) which attempts to unco-ver the roots of this truly extraordinary phenomenon in the area of immediate citizens‘ control. Summaries weiterlesen

Summary

United Against Citizens‘ Protest – Stasi-Secret Police, People’s Police and the SED-Leadership – An Editorial Staff Commentary and Report
Both provide a first survey of developing events in the GDR. Based on reports of those directly involved in protest activities, discussions with friends in the GDR and available press reports, we attempt to present a tentative survey-report of on-going developments in the political protest movement in the GDR and police reactions to it.
As far as is currently clear, the differences do not lie in the police tactics being used. Police pincer tactics, arbitrary arrests, agents provocateurs, psychological degradation at the onset of custody for purposes of demorali-zation and, of course just good old beatings all belong to the standard ar-senals all too-well known on both sides of the border. The major difference lies in the social depth and breadth of the protest movement in the GDR. In our eyes, it was especially the magnitude and scope of the movement which made it possible for protestors to renounce acts of desperate militancy. Summary weiterlesen

Summary

CILIP is happy to follow the last special topic issue with a potpourri of several different topics. One special field of interest will be domestic security policies in Westberlin due to the change in that city’s municipal administration following January’s elections.
This edition’s editorial discusses the new political landscape as well as initial political reactions to the change of government. On the one hand, the left-wing radical scene has chosen  „There’s no alternative to revolution“ as its new slogan (as Otto Diedrichs/Till Meyer’s article attests), on the other hand, powerful forces within the police and its leadership would appear to CILIP: A Target for West German Secret Police Surveillance?have it in for the new coalition.  With the SPD/Alterna-tive List (Greens) now in power, some domestic security policy changes are to be expected. Summary weiterlesen

Summary

This is once more an edition which is devoted exclusively to internal security legislation in the Federal Republic of Germany. Strong public pressure forced the coalition of Christian Democrats and Free Democrats to change earlier drafts of the legislation from 1985. In this issue we publish the following revised drafts that were introduced into the West German parliament in April 1989:
– the law concerning the cooperation between the federal and state internal intelligence agencies
* the Military intelligence service act (MAD)
* the Federal espionage service act (BND)
* the Federal data protection act
* the public service procedure act – regulating the handling of personal data in public service agencies. Summary weiterlesen

Summary

This issue does not focus on a central theme. It deals with different aspects of present day policing in W-Germany.

Editorial
The editorial discusses the relationship between politics and police in the light of a forthcoming event: The annual meeting of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) which is scheduled to take place in Berlin this fall. The attemps by several organizations and third-world-groups in Germany to inform about the dangerous role of the IMF in the world economic system will climax in September, when about 10.000 bankers and officials will meet in the city. Official sources already voice their concern about „the most difficult task of the Berlin police since the end of the Second World War“. The Berlin police force with its 12.000 members will be enlarged by another 2.500 men from the Federal Republic. Summary weiterlesen