Archiv der Kategorie: Summaries

The – yet – only englishspoken section of Bürgerrechte & Polizei/CILIP. FInd here a brief summary of all articles of each edition.

Summaries

Focus: Access to Information

Access to documents and internal security
by Norbert Pütter
Access of citizens to information about the state and to data, which the state collects, is an old demand of the civil liberties movement. Today, freedom of information acts exist in eleven German Länder, and at the federal level since 2006. However, security authorities are well shielded by exemption clauses, secret services do not fall under the scope of the acts and they are almost immune against access rights and parliamentary oversight. Hence, the fortification of the security apparatus against information requests is rather unaffected despite of few success stories. Summaries weiterlesen

Summaries

Focus: Policing the Crisis

When the emergency button is pushed – an introduction
by Heiner Busch
Moral panics and police violence are regular ingredients of crisis management. This is not only the case in the south of Europe, where the police clearly takes the role of enforcing austerity measures, but also in Germany. Stop and search operations are concentrated in poorer districts of the big cities. Where bureaucratic measures fail, the police comes into action. Summaries weiterlesen

Summaries

Focus: Secret Intelligence Agencies

The Parliamentary Enquiry Committee and the Intelligence Agencies – an introduction
by Wolf-Dieter Narr
The scandals concerning the NSA (National Security Agency) and previously the NSU (National Socialist Underground) have again raised the question: Who guards the internal security and who protects us from the guardians? Compared with the previous enquiry committees, the NSU commission takes a rather critical view and provides much material. However, the committee does not challenge the system of undercover informants and the intelligence agencies in general. Summaries weiterlesen

Summaries

Focus: Racial profiling

The institutional racism of police checks and beyond
by Heiner Busch
Stops and identity checks only on the grounds of the colours of the skin or the „foreign“ appearance of persons are unconstitutional and therefore do not occur, says the German government. Police officers receive special human rights and anti-discrimination training. In the government’s and the police‘ perception, racial profiling if it ever does occur is the result of an individual abuse of power. In fact, however, it is part of the logic of police controls without reasonable suspicion and inherent to the police task to control migration. Racial profiling is not only part of police stops and controls. Ethnic minorities and immigrant communities are repeatedly conceived and treated as dangerous. Summaries weiterlesen

Summaries

Focus: Police state protection

Way out or way off? Democracy with dynamic protective fence

by WolfDieter Narr

Since the involvement of the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution (FOPC, Bundesamt für Verfassungsschutz) in the scandal concerning the ‚NationalSocialist Underground‘ demands have been increasingly made in leftwing and leftliberal circles for the abolition of the domestic secret service. Some critics are now of the opinion that the police force, or to put it more clearly, the political police, can undertake the tasks performed until now by the FOPC, as they are better controlled and act more constitutionally. This is an obviously false conclusion. Political penal law, the essential instrument applied by the police force, has always criminalised political convictions. Linked to this are comprehensive procedural criminal and police powers for surveillance. Therefore not only the abolition of the FOPC is necessary, but also a thorough cleanup of the political penal and police laws, which are riddled with imaginary political enemies, together with a democratic reform of the police force as a whole. Summaries weiterlesen

Summaries

Thematic focus: The state’s fight against right?

Accident NSU: Wrong interpretations and the usual solutions
by Heiner Busch
For almost 13 years, the trio Uwe Mundlos, Uwe Böhnhard and Beate Zschäpe were able to live underground, undisturbed by police and secret services and to commit nine murders of immigrants and one police officer, two bomb attacks with dozens injured and fourteen bank robberies. There are currently four parliamentary investigation committees dealing with the „National Socialist Underground” (NSU) and the failure of the „security services” – one in the Federal Lower House of Parliament and three in regional parliaments. The Federal Government and the established parties, however, have already come to a conclusion: lack of coordination, lack of information exchange and unclear remits are supposed to be the reasons for the failure of the security services. The conclusions and demands are, accordingly, more cooperation between police and security forces and strengthening the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution (Verfassungsschutz). Summaries weiterlesen

Summaries

100 x CILIP: Civil liberties in the shadow of police

by Wolf-Dieter Narr
In March 1978, Bürgerrechte & Polizei/CILIP published its first issue. Since then, the journal has pursued a double agenda: it did and still does aim at providing an information service and to focus on a broad set of issues: structural data on police developments in Germany and Europe; including legal developments, personal data, deployed weapons, problems with the control of police and opportunities to create public awareness around these themes. On the other hand, this information service sought to support the work of critical civil society groups with well-analysed and convincing data. Summaries weiterlesen