Archiv der Kategorie: Summaries

The – yet – only englishspoken section of Bürgerrechte & Polizei/CILIP. FInd here a brief summary of all articles of each edition.

Summaries

Thematic focus: Nothing but counter-terrorism?

Almost suspicious – an introduction

by Heiner Busch

The man who killed twelve people by driving a truck into a Berlin Christmas market on 19 December 2016 was under close surveillance by the police. However, the evidence for making a criminal case was not sufficient. The German government is now planning to expand the powers against so-called “dangerous persons” and aims, among others, to amend the Residence Act and the Federal Criminal Police Office Act. Summaries weiterlesen

Summaries

Thematic focus: European state powers against migration

From the “refugee crisis” back to “normality“
by Heiner Busch
Since 19 April 2015, when around 900 people drowned during a shipwreck off Libya, EU migration politics are in overdrive. In May, the Commission tabled its European Agenda on Migration. Since September several EU Member States attempt stopping refugees on the “Balkans route” by closing their borders. Now, the EU is trying to return to “normality” – a normality which means that refugees and migrants are kept out of the EU or are at best treated as problem of the states at the external borders. Summaries weiterlesen

Summaries

Thematic focus: Social work and the police

Social work in the basement of policing – an introduction
by Norbert Pütter
The relationship between the police and social work is disputed in Germany since the 1970s. Though the differing professional self-concepts – control and law enforcement on the one hand, assistance and support on the other hand – is recognized, the assumption that social workers and the police target the same clientele and, thus, have to cooperate is an integral part of the security policy discourse. Whereas the police developed methods of quasi-social work, the policing aspects of social work were unfolded in the context of neoliberal policies since the 1990s. Meanwhile social work is at risk to lose its independence within the diverse networks of cooperation. Summaries weiterlesen

Summaries

Focus: Access to Information

Access to documents and internal security
by Norbert Pütter
Access of citizens to information about the state and to data, which the state collects, is an old demand of the civil liberties movement. Today, freedom of information acts exist in eleven German Länder, and at the federal level since 2006. However, security authorities are well shielded by exemption clauses, secret services do not fall under the scope of the acts and they are almost immune against access rights and parliamentary oversight. Hence, the fortification of the security apparatus against information requests is rather unaffected despite of few success stories. Summaries weiterlesen

Summaries

Focus: Policing the Crisis

When the emergency button is pushed – an introduction
by Heiner Busch
Moral panics and police violence are regular ingredients of crisis management. This is not only the case in the south of Europe, where the police clearly takes the role of enforcing austerity measures, but also in Germany. Stop and search operations are concentrated in poorer districts of the big cities. Where bureaucratic measures fail, the police comes into action. Summaries weiterlesen

Summaries

Focus: Secret Intelligence Agencies

The Parliamentary Enquiry Committee and the Intelligence Agencies – an introduction
by Wolf-Dieter Narr
The scandals concerning the NSA (National Security Agency) and previously the NSU (National Socialist Underground) have again raised the question: Who guards the internal security and who protects us from the guardians? Compared with the previous enquiry committees, the NSU commission takes a rather critical view and provides much material. However, the committee does not challenge the system of undercover informants and the intelligence agencies in general. Summaries weiterlesen

Summaries

Focus: Racial profiling

The institutional racism of police checks and beyond
by Heiner Busch
Stops and identity checks only on the grounds of the colours of the skin or the „foreign“ appearance of persons are unconstitutional and therefore do not occur, says the German government. Police officers receive special human rights and anti-discrimination training. In the government’s and the police‘ perception, racial profiling if it ever does occur is the result of an individual abuse of power. In fact, however, it is part of the logic of police controls without reasonable suspicion and inherent to the police task to control migration. Racial profiling is not only part of police stops and controls. Ethnic minorities and immigrant communities are repeatedly conceived and treated as dangerous. Summaries weiterlesen